First, the soil around the corm is loosened, and then, the corm is pulled up by grabbing the base of the petioles. In Eastern part of Uttar Pradesh, arbi, known as arabi ka patta, is used to make the dish sahina. Flooded cultivation has some advantages over dry-land cultivation: higher yields (about double), out-of-season production (which may result in higher prices), and weed control (which flooding facilitates). [58] The Hawaiian word for family, ʻohana, is derived from ʻohā, the shoot which grows from the kalo corm. The cormlets are called poulles (sing. Taro is always prepared boiled. It is called arvi in Urdu and Hindi in north India, which is often pronounced as arbi. <, Domesticated plants and animals of Austronesia, "Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott - Names of Plants in India", "Jimbi in English, translation, Swahili-English Dictionary", "Malanga - Spanish to English Translation | Spanish Central", "Malanga | Definición de Malanga por Oxford Dicitionaries en Lexico.com también significado de Malanga", "Elephant Ears (Colocasia, Alocasia, and Xanthosoma)", "The Nomenclature of the Taro and its Varieties", "Invasive Plants to Watch for in Georgia", new-agri.co Country profile: Samoa, New Agriculturist Online, "Genetic Diversification and Dispersal of Taro (, "Foraging-farming transitions at the Niah Caves, Sarawak, Borneo", "A Brief Note on the 2007 Excavation at Ille Cave, Palawan, the Philippines", "Direct evidence for human use of plants 28,000 years ago: starch residues on stone artefacts from the northern Solomon Islands", "Transitions to Farming in Island Southeast Asia: Archaeological, Biomolecular and Palaeoecological Perspectives", "Ancient Chamorro Agricultural Practices", "FAO: Taro cultivation in Asia and the Pacific, 1999", "Taro Cultivation in Asia and the Pacific", http://hbs.bishopmuseum.org/botany/taro/key/HawaiianKalo/Media/Html/history.html, "Real Estate Guide Plano – Hottest Deals On Market", "How to Make Coconut and Taro Ice Cream – A Thai Classic Dessert", "Humayunpur: A Mini North-Eastern Food Hub In Safdarjung", "Bengali style kochur loti dish, Taro stolon curry", "The Dasheen: A Root Crop for the Southern States. The leaf buds called kosu loti (কচু লতি) are cooked with sour dried fruits and called thekera (থেকেৰা) or sometimes eaten alongside tamarind, elephant apple, a small amount of pulses, or fish. In Manipur, the leaves are used in the Meitei ethnic cuisine, locally known as utti (pronounce ootti). The global average yield is 6.2 tonnes per hectare (2.8 short tons per acre) but varies according to the region. They can be grown in almost any temperature zone as long as the summer is warm. Linnaeus originally described two species, Colocasia esculenta and Colocasia antiquorum, but many later botanists consider them both to be members of a single, very variable species, the correct name for which is Colocasia esculenta. Now, as man continues to work the wetlands for this sacred crop, he remembers Haloanaka, the ancestor that nourishes him. It can also be shredded into long strips which are woven together to form a seafood birdsnest. In temperate regions, they are planted out for the summer and dug up and stored over winter, dry and with ventilation to prevent fungal infection. It can be grown indoors with high humidity. In Ghana, it substitutes for plantain in making fufu when plantains are out of season. The leaves and stems of certain varieties of taro are also used as a vegetable in Kerala. Definitions of what constitutes an inhame and a cará vary regionally, but the common understanding in Brazil is that carás are potato-like in shape, while inhames are more oblong. As in other Asian countries, taro is a popular flavor for ice cream in Thailand.[64]. The Hawaii Agricultural Statistics Service determined the 10-year median production of kalo in Hawaii to be about 6.1 million pounds (2,800 t). The most popular dish is a spicy curry made with prawn and taro corms. The root of the taro plant is often served boiled, accompanied by stewed fish or meat, curried, often with peas and eaten with roti, or in soups. Edible varieties (kiri ala, kolakana ala, gahala, and sevel ala) are cultivated for their corms and leaves. In Suriname it is called tayer, taya, pomtayer or pongtaya.